Stop ClickBank Refunds

Making money with ClickBank is not always easy. In fact, trying to sell any product online can be a difficult task sometimes. You’ve spent time, effort and money on getting visitors to your site, building landing pages, and trying to be honest in your reviews about the products you’re marketing. You’ve done your job, and you’ve done it well. Then the refund pops into play. They buy the product and then come back for a refund. It’s now your job to stop clickbank refunds by way of marking products properly.

ClickBank refunds can not only kill a campaign, they can put major wrenches into your finances. If you’re counting on that dollar being in your bank account and leveraging it to gain more traffic, your business just got mangled.

The best thing you can do is probably change your verbiage on your sales pages. You want to make sure to present the product properly, in a way that won’t give the customer that “buyer’s remorse” feeling. That’s the feeling that pushes them to ask for their money back.

Instead, help them get to a place where they know exactly what they’re purchasing and they’re drooling at the mouth for it. If you’ve brought in the right traffic, this shouldn’t be too hard. Hopefully based on your ads or other marketing, you’ve already presented the problem that the ClickBank product solves. Seriously. If it doesn’t solve the problem the client has, then they shouldn’t be buying it in the first place. It’s your job to inform them that this thing they’re buying is what they’ve been looking for. If it’s not, they’ll certainly ask for their refund. I would do the same at a restaurant if the waiter told me it was crab cakes and I was delivered a taco (no offense to tacos).

Now, of course you probably know everything I’ve mentioned above. You’re a marketer. But, there is this guy who’s much better at dealing with ClickBank than I am. He’s written quite a bit on the subject of how to work with the site and be a good affiliate, making money. He has one book in particular called Stop Those ClickBank Refunds. I’ll tell you right now his website needs a little work and it’s kinda hard to figure out how to buy the book. But, investing $37 to learn in-depth details on how not to get so many refunds when you’re selling those products… well, that’s well worth the money.

I mentioned it was a little difficult to find the link to buy his eBook, so I’m going to walk you through his site right now so you know where to go if you want to invest in the education.

Start here (opens a new window so you can still see the directions here).

On the bottom right product, click the link.

On the bottom right product, click the link.


On the bottom right product, click the link.

Scroll to the very bottom of the page and click the "here" link.

Scroll to the very bottom of the page and click the "here" link.


Scroll to the very bottom of the page and click the "here" link.

Scroll to the bottom of this page too, and then click the $37 link

Scroll to the bottom of this page too, and then click the $37 link


Scroll to the bottom of this page too, and then click the $37 link

Now, at the time of this writing, he’s offering it for $37, but I don’t know when he’ll change that price. So, if you’re even thinking about it for a second, I’d jump on it.

Go for it. A $37 investment into a marketing solution to stopping those ClickBank chargebacks is really nothing in the long run. With just 1% more sales you should be able to cover the cost. Stop ClickBank refunds by starting here (opens a new window so you can still see my directions).

I’m going to add here that this is (pretty obviously) a test of a new product I’m reviewing. Sorry if it’s off topic a bit.

Nate Ritter lives in San Diego, CA who popularized the #hashtag and creates scaleable web applications for a living. He also does miles and point hacking to enable cheap travel for his family. More here →

3 Comments on "Stop ClickBank Refunds"

  1. Brent G says:

    I’ve just recently started learning about chargebacks and a lot of the other finer details of ecommerce and fraud prevention. That’s a pretty cool solution, thanks for the heads up.

  2. meme says:

    Why would I listen to someone who makes it difficult to buy his book which is to help me. It doesn’t sound promising to me; sort of like if you spend the time trying to purchase his product then you deserve what you get.

    It sounds just like the other junk out there in cyber land; I’ll keep my $37 in my pocket.

  3. nate says:

    Valid point Meme. I don’t like difficult to use websites either. That’s why I added the “how to”. But, to each their own.

 
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